Agreement Establishing Intergovernmental Authority on Development

IGAD aims to promote regional security and maintain economic development. The IGAD Guiding Principles are set out in the IGAD Agreement and are coherent and contribute to the principles of the United Nations and African unity. IGAD`s objectives include the promotion of peace and stability in the subregion and the establishment of mechanisms within the subregion to prevent, manage and resolve inter-State and internal conflicts through dialogue. In April 1995, the Assembly of Heads of State or Government in Addis Ababa issued a statement on the revival of IGADD and the expansion of cooperation among member States. On the 21st. In March 1996, the Nairobi Assembly signed the IGADD Charter Amendment Instrument, which established the revived regional organization under the new name of « Intergovernmental Authority on Development ». At the Summit of Heads of State or Government held in Djibouti on 25 November 1996, IGAD was launched with expanded areas of regional cooperation and a new organizational structure. Article 18 of the founding agreement of IGAD provides that Member States shall act jointly to maintain peace, security and stability in order to facilitate economic development. With this in mind, IGAD has been fully involved in peace efforts in Somalia and South Sudan since its inception. Even today, the restoration of peace in the Sudan and Somalia is the primary objective of the Assembly of Heads of State and Government. The IGAD peace process, a regional initiative based on a declaration of principles, provides the framework for resolving Sudan`s 17-year civil war. Kenya chairs the IGAD process, which is joined by the Eritrean, Ethiopian and Ugandan mediators. In the medium term, IGAD aims to build capacity in the areas of conflict prevention and the mitigation and containment of humanitarian crises.

The Intergovernmental Authority on Development was established in 1996. It succeeded the former Intergovernmental Authority on Drought and Development (IGADD), a multinational organization founded in 1986 by Djibouti, Ethiopia, Somalia, Sudan, Uganda and Kenya, focused on development and environmental control. IGADD headquarters were then moved to Djibouti after Member States signed an agreement in January 1986. Eritrea joined the organization in 1993 after gaining independence. [3] In 1983 and 1984, six countries in the Horn of Africa (Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan and Uganda) took steps through the United Nations to establish an intergovernmental body to jointly combat drought and desertification in the region. The Assembly of Heads of State and Government met in January 1986 to sign the agreement formally establishing IGADD, based in Djibouti. The state of Eritrea became the seventh member after gaining independence in 1993 and South Sudan joined in 2011. The Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) succeeds the Intergovernmental Authority on Drought and Development (IGADD), which was founded in 1986 by six drought-stricken East African countries to coordinate development in the Horn of Africa. IGAD is headquartered in Djibouti. In April 1996, the IGAD Council of Ministers, on the recommendation of heads of State or Government, identified three priority areas for cooperation: conflict prevention, management and resolution, and humanitarian affairs; infrastructure development (transport and communications); and food safety and environmental protection. IGAD aims to promote regional security and maintain economic development. The IGAD Guiding Principles are set out in the IGAD Agreement and are coherent and contribute to the principles of the United Nations and African unity.

IGAD`s objectives include the promotion of peace and stability in the subregion and the establishment of mechanisms within the subregion to prevent, manage and resolve inter-State and internal conflicts through dialogue. Article 18 of the founding agreement of IGAD provides that Member States shall act jointly to maintain peace, security and stability in order to facilitate economic development. With this in mind, IGAD has been fully involved in peace efforts in Somalia and South Sudan since its inception. Even today, the restoration of peace in the Sudan and Somalia is the primary objective of the Assembly of Heads of State and Government. The IGAD peace process, a regional initiative based on a declaration of principles, provides the framework for resolving Sudan`s 17-year civil war. Kenya chairs the IGAD process, which is joined by the Eritrean, Ethiopian and Ugandan mediators. In the medium term, IGAD aims to build capacity in the areas of conflict prevention and the mitigation and containment of humanitarian crises. IGAD has several important institutions. The Assembly of Heads of State or Government, which meets at least once a year, shall be the supreme organ of the Authority.

The Council of Ministers, composed of the Foreign Ministers and another priority Minister appointed by each Member State, shall meet at least twice a year. The Committee of Ambassadors, composed of ambassadors or plenipotentiaries of IGAD Member States accredited in the country of IGAD headquarters, advises and directs the Executive Secretary. The purpose of this Council is to assist the Secretary in implementing the work plan approved by the Council of Ministers and in interpreting policies and guidelines that need further development. The Secretariat is the executive organ of the Authority and is headed by an Executive Secretary appointed by the Assembly of Heads of State or Government for a term of four years, which may be renewed once. In addition to the Office of the Executive Secretary, the Secretariat has three departments, one in the areas of economic cooperation, agriculture and environment, and political and humanitarian affairs. The IGAD member States are: Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, Uganda and Eritrea. Eritrea became the seventh member of IGAD after its independence in 1993. 6 April 2020 (DJIBOUTI, Djibouti): The Executive Secretary of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), Mr. Workneh Gebeyehu, this morning presented a cheque worth $100,000 (approximately 17,775,000 Djiboutian francs) to the Secretary-General of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation of the Republic of Djibouti, Mr. Mohamed Ali Hassan, as a sign of solidarity of the employees of the regional organization towards the Republic of Djibouti in its fight against COVID-19. 30. March 2020 (DJIBOUTI, Djibouti): The Heads of State and Government of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) today convened a special summit by videoconference to discuss an IGAD regional strategy to combat the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19) in the region.

Sources: IGAD Ministries of Health of Member States World Health Organization (WHO). 31 August 2020 (ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia): The Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), in partnership with the European Union (EU) and the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS) at Addis Ababa`s Bole International Airport, today hosted a €14 million handover ceremony for supplies and equipment as part of the broader €60 million EU health and health impacts response programme. socio-economic covid-19 in the igad region. Ethiopia. IGAD has several important institutions. The Assembly of Heads of State or Government, which meets at least once a year, shall be the supreme organ of the Authority. The Council of Ministers, composed of the Foreign Ministers and another priority Minister appointed by each Member State, shall meet at least twice a year. The Committee of Ambassadors, composed of ambassadors or plenipotentiaries of IGAD Member States accredited in the country of IGAD headquarters, advises and directs the Executive Secretary. The purpose of this Council is to assist the Secretary in implementing the work plan approved by the Council of Ministers and in interpreting policies and guidelines that need further development. The Secretariat shall be the executive organ of the Authority and shall be headed by an Executive Secretary appointed by the Assembly of Heads of State or Government for a term of four years, which may be renewed once […].